CVF in the News

By Ben Christopher, CAL Matters, November 3, 2020

Excerpts:

If you were looking for the best advice on how to spend the hours after the polls close on election night, here’s the best we have to offer: Go do something else.

Turn off your TV, close your computer, put away your phone. Now go for a walk. Bake a dessert with your family. Take up knitting. Pop a few melatonin and go to sleep early. Do anything but spend the remaining dark hours of Nov. 3 ping-ponging through the cable news channels, doom scrolling on Twitter and watching the New York Times’ dreaded needle (or CalMatters’ own California election results tracker) for any sign of what the will of the people will hold.

But you are not looking for the best advice on how to spend tonight. We know this because you’re reading an article called “A user’s guide to California’s election night results.”

By Mina Kim, KQED. November 3, 2020

On Election Day, we check in with Kim Alexander of the California Voter Foundation about how voting is going around the state and take your last-minute questions. We want to hear from you: what do the polls look like in your area? (Full Audio)

 

Capital Public Radio, November 3, 2020

Election Day has finally arrived. Tens of millions of Americans will head to the polls to vote for either Republican incumbent President Donald Trump or Democrat Joe Biden. Nearly 100 million American voters have already cast early ballots but election officials are saying that days or weeks could pass before we know the winner of the presidential election. Today on Insight, Election Day, what you need to know, and what’s at stake. (Full Audio)

By Alice Woelfle, KQED, November 3, 2020

Judge Upholds 'Abuse of Power' Lawsuit Against Governor Newsom

A judge in Sutter County has handed a victory to two Republican state lawmakers who filed an “abuse of power” lawsuit against Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom. The judge struck down an executive order the governor issued in June which set up new requirements for the 2020 election.
Guest: Assemblyman James Gallagher (R-Yuba City)

California Businesses Brace for Potentially Violent Protests

Californians have already voted in record numbers. There is excitement, but there’s also tension in cities and towns around the state. Many businesses are boarding up their windows and bracing for potentially violent protests.
Reporter: Caleigh Wells, KCRW

Oakland Law Enforcement on Standby for Election Night Unrest

By Peter Kronish, WHO.WHAT.WHY., November 2, 2020

Excerpts:

Are you here to vote?” Arianna asked two men and a woman approaching the basement entrance to the Hollywood Hotel’s ballroom in Los Angeles. “Just go in and make a right. Tell them if you’re dropping off your ballot so you don’t have to wait.” In less than 15 minutes, the three voters strode back out of the doorway and up the steps to the street, “I Voted” stickers on display. 

“There really are so many ways to safely vote here in LA County,” Arianna, a 30-year-old poll volunteer, told WhoWhatWhy. “In my opinion, there really is no good excuse to not get out there and exercise your right to vote.” 

By Peter Kronish, Who.What.Why., November 2, 2020

Excerpts:

“Are you here to vote?” Arianna asked two men and a woman approaching the basement entrance to the Hollywood Hotel’s ballroom in Los Angeles. “Just go in and make a right. Tell them if you’re dropping off your ballot so you don’t have to wait.” In less than 15 minutes, the three voters strode back out of the doorway and up the steps to the street, “I Voted” stickers on display. 

“There really are so many ways to safely vote here in LA County,” Arianna, a 30-year-old poll volunteer, told WhoWhatWhy. “In my opinion, there really is no good excuse to not get out there and exercise your right to vote.” 

By Cheri Carlson, VC Star, October 30, 2020

Exceprts:

Starting Saturday, people can vote in person at 48 locations in Ventura County.

Because of the pandemic, special rules allowed counties to have fewer places for voters to cast their ballots in person. But they also had to be open four days instead of just one.

"If they're planning to vote in person, please, please, please take advantage of the Oct. 31, Nov. 1 and Nov. 2 dates," said Miranda Nobriga, spokeswoman for the county elections division. "Do not wait until Election Day."

In previous elections, voters were assigned to one of hundreds of polling places. This time, voters can show up at any of the 48 spots. That means, popular times or locations could be far busier than in the past, leading to longer lines and delays.

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When should I vote?

By Aaron Mendelson, Laist, October 30, 2020

Excerpts:

In Los Angeles, election officials have already received 2.1 million ballots. In Orange County, the figure is nearing 750,000. And across the United States, more than 80 million ballots have been cast. 

Do the sky-high early voting numbers mean we'll see record turnout in 2020?

They're certainly a good sign, experts say. But thanks to California's voter-friendly laws, it takes weeks to tally every ballot, and that means we may not know the precise turnout figures until after Thanksgiving.

Millions of ballots have already arrived at counting centers, but election officials still have to process them. That involves checking signatures, tallying write-in votes and inspecting damaged ballots.

Other votes will arrive on election night. In Los Angeles, some are transported to counting centers by sheriff's deputies in helicopters and on boats.

By Chris Nichols, Captal Public Radio, October 30, 2020

Excepts:

Millions of Californians have already cast their ballot by mail, but millions more are expected to show up to the polls for early voting this weekend and on Election Day.

They’ll do this amid concerns about voter intimidation, social unrest and a statewide spike in coronavirus cases.

To answer questions about how to vote this year, including how to stay safe while voting in-person and what you can and can’t do at the polls, PolitiFact California spoke with election officials and experts. 

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When Will California’s Election Results Be Available? 

By Julia Shapero, Daily Bruin, October 28, 2020

Young voters in California are more likely than older voters to have their vote-by-mail ballots rejected, a September study found.

The study, which was published by the California Voter Foundation, examined trends in rejected ballots across the state. Over the last decade, election officials rejected 1.7% of vote-by-mail ballots cast in statewide elections, according to the study. However, voters between the ages of 18 and 24 had their vote-by-mail ballots rejected at about three times the rate of older voters in the three counties studied, said Kim Alexander, president and founder of the California Voter Foundation.

Young voters have several factors working against them, said Alexander, who was a co-author on the study. When it comes to casting vote-by-mail ballots, young voters are more likely to be new to voting, unaccustomed to making signatures and unfamiliar with using the United States Postal Service, she added.

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